What are One Point Lessons?

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One Point Lessons are short visual presentations on a single point that have three purposes:

  • They sharpen job-related knowledge and skills by communicating information about specific problems and improvements.
  • They easily share important information just-in-time.
  • They improve the team’s performance.

Safety

This type of lesson fills a safety gap. It ensures the team members have the knowledge they need to do their job safely and are aware of the potential risks.

Basic knowledge

This type of lesson fills a knowledge gap. It ensures the team members have the knowledge they need to do their job or participate in improvement activities.

Trouble

This type of lesson gives actual examples of breakdowns, defects and other abnormalities to illustrate how to identify and/or avoid a workplace problem. It is most effective when presented immediately after the problem occurs.

Improvement

This type of lesson summarizes the concepts, contents, and results of improvements that result from team activities.  It helps teams in other areas make similar improvements.


Hints for Good OPL’s

  • OPL should be 80% visual and 20% written. Use sketches and pictures to show the training point;
  • The writer is the first trainer but then on all the trained can be trainers. Be sure to date and initial the OPL after training is conducted;
  • Remember the OPL’s should be routed for review by a knowledgeable person. Suggestions for other reviewers are Safety, Quality and Engineering;
  • The THEME is very short definition of the OPL, i. e Demonstrate how to change Squid ink. The PURPOSE explains in detail why the OPL is needed and how to implement as well as benefits of the OPL.

Example – blank OPL – wrong/right – boxed content




OPL Process Flow-Example

The OPL’s are posted on the activity board for three months then moved to a 3 ring binder for future reference and use. The binder should be located at the activity board.

Remember – Teaching is Learning!

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